Archive | Pork

You’ll Never Believe it’s Paleo – Sweet and Sour Pork

“You’ll never believe it’s paleo sweet and sour pork” began when I was reading Fuschia Dunlop’s book Shark’s Fin and Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet-and-Sour Memoir of Eating in China, and she mentioned Cantonese cooking. It reminded me of Mediterranean cooking in that the ingredients are the star and do not feature complicated sauces or culinary techniques. It’s probably why most Americans’ introduction to Chinese cooking are dishes like sweet and sour pork or moo goo gai pan.

Sweet and Sour Pork

Sweet and Sour Pork

This made me wonder about cookbooks featuring Cantonese cuisine. Turns out, there aren’t many. But I did find a wonderful book by Kian Lam Kho called Phoenix Claws and Jade Trees: Essential Techniques of Authentic Chinese Cooking. In it is a recipe for Sweet and Sour Pork that’s not only the best of what I remember of my own first forays into Chinese cooking, but it’s paleo friendly, too! With only a few minor modifications, I was able to make a delicious, fun and nutritious meal with crispy pork, juicy pineapple and fresh crispy bell peppers and oh! that yummy sauce!!

Sweet and Sour Pork Ingredients

Sweet and Sour Pork Ingredients

I was visiting the Cape last week and enjoying a lovely time with my parents, sister and sweet bunny, Allison. We went shopping for fabric pieces for my photos, cooked lots of nice things for my folks’ freezer and I asked her for a suggestion for a side dish. She immediately came up with cucumber noodles in the style of cold Chinese noodles in peanut sauce. I used crunchy almond butter in place of the peanuts and it was so good!

Cucumber Noodles with Spicy Almond Sauce

Cucumber Noodles with Spicy Almond Sauce

I can’t believe it’s Labor Day already! I know there are lots of happy/sad people enjoying the last of summer vacation and beautiful Cape Cod weather. Ten weeks go by so quickly! There are new tunes and best wishes for a great weekend. Enjoy!!

Pink Rose

Pink Rose

Sweet and Sour Pork
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
You'll Never Believe it's Paleo Sweet and Sour Pork
Adapted from Kian Lam Kho's Phoenix Claws and Jade Trees: Essential Techniques of Authentic Chinese Cooking. The real deal taste of your favorite Chinese take out. Fresh, delicious and paleo, too.
You'll Never Believe it's Paleo Sweet and Sour Pork
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Adapted from Kian Lam Kho's Phoenix Claws and Jade Trees: Essential Techniques of Authentic Chinese Cooking. The real deal taste of your favorite Chinese take out. Fresh, delicious and paleo, too.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl, mix together egg white, sake or Chinese rice wine, salt and white pepper. Add pork and mix thoroughly.
  2. Meanwhile in a small bowl, mix chicken stock, tomato paste, honey, rice vinegar onion powder and crushed red pepper (if using). Taste for seasoning, increasing honey or vinegar to your taste. Add 2 tsp tapioca starch and whisk together.
  3. Place a colander in a large mixing bowl. Add 1/4 of the coated pork pieces. Sprinkle with 1/4 of the tapioca starch and toss, making sure the pieces are coated and excess starch is shaken off. Remove to another bowl. Repeat with remaining pork pieces, using starch from the bowl underneath the colander as needed.
  4. Heat coconut oil in 3-quart saucepan over medium high heat. Drop one pork piece into the oil to test. Oil should rapidly bubble around the meat otherwise it will be greasy. Add pork pieces to saucepan so there is plenty of space between them. Cook for approximately 2 minutes or until golden brown. Using tongs or slotted spoon, turn over remaining pieces and cook until second side is golden brown, approximately 2 more minutes. Remove cooked pork to paper-towel lined plate and cook remaining pork in batches, adjusting heat as necessary to maintain bubbles.
  5. In a 12-inch skillet, over medium high heat, add 3 tablespoons of coconut oil from saucepan used to cook pork. Add onion and cook for 2-3 minutes until translucent but not brown. Add red and green pepper pieces and pineapple. Cook for about 2 minutes.
  6. Whisk sauce ingredients to recombine. Add to skillet with vegetables. Toss and cook until sauce thickens and is shiny. Add pork pieces and cook about 3 minutes or until pork is heated through. Serve immediately.
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Cucumber Noodles with Spicy Almond Sauce
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Cucumber Noodles with Spicy Almond Sauce
Cool and crunchy, nutty with a kick of heat and honey. These cucumber noodles will be a welcome side dish to an Asian entrée or grilled poultry, meat or fish.
Cucumber Noodles with Spicy Almond Sauce
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Cool and crunchy, nutty with a kick of heat and honey. These cucumber noodles will be a welcome side dish to an Asian entrée or grilled poultry, meat or fish.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a salad bowl, mix together dressing ingredients. Add cucumber and mix gently. Taste for seasoning and adjust to desired sweetness, saltiness, and heat.
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
0

Small Plates for Supper

 

Scallop Sashimi

Scallop Sashimi

When we go to a restaurant, we’d rather eat things we either don’t or can’t easily make at home. Why pay outrageous money for an okay steak and so-so salad when we can do much better ourselves? We go to Hawks for crawfish in Rayne and have sushi every couple of months at various places in Lafayette. We don’t do traditional slow-smoked barbecue, so that’s something we look for when dining out. Plus it’s one specialty that lends itself easily to low carb and paleo-friendly.

When we’re on the road for Harris’s work, if I can cook I’ll go along for the ride. I make suppers all but one night and then find an interesting place to try out nearby. Lately I’ve discovered if there’s pork belly on the menu, the restaurant is one we’ll enjoy. First because we love pork belly and two, a chef who features it, loves it as well and usually has a delicious take on the ingredient. Here’s where we’ve had some fabulous pork belly appetizers and some wonderful entrées, too:

The Spotted Horse at Evangeline Downs in Opelousas was the first place we saw it on a menu, and this version combines citrus and Asian flavorings for a sweetish and savory profile. The restaurant is upscale and urban and a great date spot. Even though it’s located next to the gaming floor, you can’t hear the slot machines.

The Spotted Horse at Evangeline Downs, Opelousas, LA

The Spotted Horse at Evangeline Downs, Opelousas, LA

We’ve been to two great restaurants in Jackson, Miss. recently. Saltine is in an old mid-century school. The dining area is retro stylish and through the big windows and across the hallway, you can see the kitchen. Here the pork belly is called PB & J—for pork belly and pepper jelly. It’s served with boiled peanuts and it’s so good. I’d never had boiled peanuts before … I know, I know they’re legumes and not paleo. And like the nuts that they are not, boiled peanuts are reminiscent of cooked beans. It’s not like we live nearby and will make a habit of the goobers, it’s a “when in Jackson,” kind of thing. And the rest of meal was easily made paleo.

P B & J: Pork belly with pepper jelly and boiled peanuts, Saltine, Jackson, MS

P B & J: Pork belly with pepper jelly and boiled peanuts, Saltine, Jackson, MS

Also in Jackson is Walker’s Drive-In. It’s right near Saltine. This landmark restaurant from the 1930s has become an upscale, farm to table restaurant that blew us away. Fabulous menu with so many great paleo-friendly choices, and the pork belly when we were there was called Ham and Eggs. Why it isn’t bacon and eggs, I’m not sure. Harris said it was probably his favorite pork belly app thus far. The chef mixes up his offerings, so if you have a chance to visit, that version might not be on the menu. The vintage dining room is really cool; you can tell the owners preserved and renovated the space rather than truck in artifacts to make it look nostalgic, and the food was superb.

Walker's Drive-In, Jackson, MS

Walker’s Drive-In, Jackson, MS

That got me to thinking about my own take on pork belly. To vary the usual entrée-plus-sides dinner, I added a scallop sashimi appetizer so we could have our own upscale, small plate, restaurant experience. The scallop sashimi couldn’t be easier. I used frozen scallops; the fruit and veg are raw, and the dressing was quick, easy and delicious. You could substitute large shrimp for the scallops. And while sashimi is often raw seafood, in this case it’s lightly poached.

Scallop Sashimi Ingredients

Scallop Sashimi Ingredients

This is adapted from Sous Vide at Home: The Modern Technique for Perfectly Cooked Meals by Lisa Q. Fetterman et al. I chose to poach the seafood in salted water for less than two minutes per side instead of using sous vide, but you can cook the scallops sous vide at 120 degrees F for 30 minutes. Chill it over ice or in the fridge while you prep the rest of the ingredients.

The unusual yuzu kosho is a spicy Japanese condiment, although minced hot chiles or sriracha can be used instead. Rather of an actual recipe, I’m suggesting guidelines. The remaining components are wash, slice and go. Choose something fruity like grapefruit, something crisp with a touch of bitterness like endive or radicchio and avocado for richness. Make the dressing from a squeeze of the grapefruit rinds, coconut aminos or tamari, some sweet—mirin or honey, a little olive or avocado oil and some form of chile. Simple.

Scallop Sashimi

Scallop Sashimi

The pork belly was just as good. I braised the belly, julienned some crispy vegetables, and served it with a tamari ( or you can use coconut aminos), ginger, scallion, and mirin or coconut sugar sauce that nicely enhanced the flavors of the other ingredients. Served in soft, butter lettuce, this dish was as paleo as it was yummy. I’ve cooked pork belly many ways in the past few months. If you season it with salt, pepper, some coconut sugar and togarashi (a Japanese spice mixture), and put it in a covered Dutch oven for three hours at 300 degrees F., you have a texture like the one in the photo below. Take off the cover and cook an additional hour and the belly will brown up and get firmer. Your choice. Slice it up. Julienne some cucumber, yellow or red bell pepper, carrot and some paper thin slice of japapeño. Wrap everything up in some soft lettuce like Bibb or Boston and drizzle on the sauce.

Butter Lettuce Wraps

Butter Lettuce Wraps

Pork Belly Lettuce Wraps

Pork Belly Lettuce Wraps

Pork Belly Wrap Garnishes

Pork Belly Wrap Garnishes

Pork Belly - Sous Vide

Braised Pork Belly

Pork Belly Wrap Sauce

Pork Belly Wrap Sauce

Cherries, Berries and Stars

Cherries, Berries and Stars

For dessert try this medley of cherries, blueberries, watermelon and piña colada jelly-shot stars. I found a cocktail recipe I liked, softened a package of gelatin in some of the pineapple juice, then warmed all the ingredients (coconut milk, rum, and honey) over low heat for about three minutes, until the gelatin was completely dissolved. I lined a loaf pan with plastic wrap, poured in the mixture and chilled it for a couple of hours. I found an inexpensive, small-star cookie cutter and punched out the cuties. The dressing was a simple combo of lime zest, lime juice and honey. Taste and adjust per your preference.

For music I’m mixing it up with some random tunes I like right now. Hope y’all are having an amazing summer!

Creole Shakshuka

Creole Shakshuka

Creole Shakshuka

It’s pretty hot in south Louisiana and sometimes a salad for supper doesn’t cut it. But I wanted something fresh and lively. I don’t do breakfast except for coffee. Occasionally I’ll have what amounts to brunch on the weekends, but I love eggs and thought of this dish for dinner. Tunisian in origin, shakshuka is a tomato and bell pepper sauce that has eggs poached in it. While nice on it’s own, I wanted to make it more substantial. So I added some fabulous smoked deer sausage from Kartchner’s and creolized the seasonings. If you haven’t been to Kartchner’s in Krotz Springs, it’s so worth a trip! The boudin is amazing. And the cracklin’s are the best; I refer to them as paleo pig candy. 🙂

Eggs, tomatoes and herbs

Eggs, tomatoes and herbs

If there is a more versatile ingredient than an egg, I don’t know what it is. Eggs can be hard boiled, scrambled, fried, poached, and shirred. If you separate the yolks and whip the whites, eggs are magically transformed into soufflés and meringues. A wonder of nutritional goodness, eggs have regained their place in the hall of fame of good real foods. And compared to other nutrient-dense ingredients, eggs are cheap. I’d like to think that paleo peeps are a strong reason that eggs are once again recognized for their contribution to health. And one of our goals is to have more grassfed and pastured options in our kitchens. If you don’t have yard birds of your own, or can’t make it to the farmers market, don’t despair, the good news is free-range eggs may become more available. And make this egg recipe! It’s delicious.

To accompany the shakshuka, I thought creamy avocados and bright, fresh citrus would be welcome. So I’ve paired the egg dish with a grapefruit and avocado salad.

Grapefruit Avocado Salad

Grapefruit Avocado Salad

New music this week … dance, dine and enjoy!!

Creole Shakshuka
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Creole Shakshuka
Creole Shakshuka: quick and easy for weeknight supper, or the star of your next brunch. Paleo, gluten free, low carb and delicious.
Creole Shakshuka
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Creole Shakshuka: quick and easy for weeknight supper, or the star of your next brunch. Paleo, gluten free, low carb and delicious.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
4servings 10minutes 25minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Cook Time
25minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Over medium heat in a 12-inch skillet, add sausage and cook, stirring occasionally until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Remove sausage to a plate and reserve.
  2. Add olive oil to now empty skillet and add onion. Sauté for 5 minutes. Add bell pepper and celery and continue to sauté for 5 minutes. Add diced tomatoes and roasted peppers. Season to taste. Bring to a rapid simmer and lower heat to medium low. Return sausage to skillet and combine.
  3. Crack eggs into the tomato sauce, leaving a bit of room around each eggs. Cover and simmer until egg whites are set and yolks are desired consistency, about 5 minutes for runny yolks. Garnish with parsley and green onions.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Grapefruit Avocado Salad
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Grapefruit Avocado Salad
Juicy pink grapefruit and luscious avocado with a refreshing citrus dressing combine into a perfect summer salad.
Grapefruit Avocado Salad
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Juicy pink grapefruit and luscious avocado with a refreshing citrus dressing combine into a perfect summer salad.
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Make dressing: combine lime juice, honey, olive oil, salt and pepper. Distribute baby spinach on salad plates. Alternate grapefruit sections and avocado slices on top of spinach. Drizzle with dressing.Grapefruit Avocado Salad
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

Muffuletta Pork Chops and Zydeco Green Beans

Muffuletta Pork Chops and Zydeco Green Beans

Muffuletta Pork Chops and Zydeco Green Beans

Way, way back in the day, folks in Acadiana would hold a bal de maison, or house dance for their friends and neighbors. You’d let everybody know by putting a flag on your fence by the road. Food was served and it was a night of music and socializing for the whole family. Another name for these dances is fais do do, which is Louisiana-French baby talk for “go to sleep.” Baby sitters weren’t a thing then, but the dances would run late. So the kids would pile into a back room to sleep. As kids are wont to do, they often popped up and ran back out into the action, and their mamas would admonish them by saying, “fais do do,” so she could get back to the fun.

Occasionally the fare served at the dance was meager. So the host might pass the word that, les haricots sont pas salé, “the green beans aren’t salty,” meaning that the beans were without pork. In French, les haricots would be pronounced, “lay zarico,” and eventually zarico morphed into zydeco and became the name for the music that was played at the dance. Originally French-speaking Cajuns and Creoles all played the same music. Starting at the end of World War II, Cajun music kind of went country and zydeco picked up on rhythm and blues.

My recipe for Zydeco Green Beans is made with tasso, but you could use bacon or pancetta. And instead of white (or as they say around here, Irish) potatoes, you can substitute sweet.

Zydeco Green Beans

Zydeco Green Beans

For the pork chops, we salute New Orleans and their iconic sandwich, the muffuletta. Not especially paleo, the muffuletta’s signature element is the olive salad. I love salsas and relishes with meat and poultry, and this addition makes for a nice change from gravy or a pan sauce. The whole meal is quick and easy, and delicious, too.

Muffuletta Pork Chops Seasoned

Muffuletta Pork Chops Seasoned

My playlist reflects the dishes with tunes by bands that play in and around New Orleans and a bunch of my favorite zydeco songs. Originally the playlist was two-and-a-half hours long, and obviously I’ve left out whole genres of Louisiana music. If I’d included the many forms of jazz, swamp pop, and Cajun, there’d be two-and-a-half days of music … with too much left out. So this will give you a taste.

Just a note and maybe you have some feedback for me. Since November my posts haven’t been as consistently scheduled as I’d like. The writing, recipe creation, music and website aspects are not a problem, but the photography has been. At first I started with just my iPhone 4, and after six months, darling Harris gave me a DSLR for Christmas. I tried learning to use it on my own through Internet searches and online courses. I was beginning to see some success, especially by having my a few of my photos accepted by foodgawker.com, but it was hit or miss. Then I had some private lessons with a professional photographer, got a macro lens and started on a new photo journey. The lens is amazing, but my “studio” lacks good lighting. And the lens is tricky to work with.

I think I’ve finally figured out a better system for the light, and we’ll see how it goes with foodgawker. It’s frustrating to know I’ve got to go back and re-shoot so many photos from the early posts, while trying to keep up with new ones. And foodgawker is vital to my becoming known in the enormous world of recipe blogs, as it has been responsible for some of my recipes being featured on sites like paleoleap.com and paleogrubs.com and new subscribers have found me through them.

What do you think? Any advice? I know photos are super important. Thank you for any words of wisdom you might have!

Muffuletta Pork Chops

Muffuletta Pork Chops

 

Muffuletta Pork Chops and Zydeco Green Beans
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Muffuletta Pork Chops
Muffuletta Pork Chops salute NOLA with the addition of savory olive salad. Giardiniera (pickled cauliflower, celery, peppers and onions) can be found in the pickle section of the super market. Cook the pork chops in my Cajun Country ghee for extra flavor!
Muffuletta Pork Chops
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Muffuletta Pork Chops salute NOLA with the addition of savory olive salad. Giardiniera (pickled cauliflower, celery, peppers and onions) can be found in the pickle section of the super market. Cook the pork chops in my Cajun Country ghee for extra flavor!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
4servings 10minutes 25minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Cook Time
25minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Season pork chops and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a 12-inch, ovenproof skillet over medium high heat, melt the ghee. Add the pork chops and brown, without moving, for 5 minutes. Turn the chops and brown the second side, 5 minutes.
  3. Place skillet in the oven and cook for about 5 minutes. Check the internal temperature of the chops with an instant read thermometer. This will depend on the thickness of the chops. They should be 160 degrees F. If needed, continue to cook, checking temperature every 5 minutes.
  4. Serve immediately, topped with olive salad.
  5. Giardiniera
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Zydeco Green Beans
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Zydeco Green Beans
Snappy, salty and delicious, Zydeco Green Beans add a two-for-one side dish for meat, poultry or seafood. Et toi!
Zydeco Green Beans
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Snappy, salty and delicious, Zydeco Green Beans add a two-for-one side dish for meat, poultry or seafood. Et toi!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Passive Time
4servings 10minutes 30minutes 20minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30minutes 20minutes
Ingredients
  • 2 medium potatoes white or sweet, peeled and cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 lb green beans trimmed and cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion coarsely chopped
  • 1 tbsp ghee or coconut oil or lard
  • 4 oz tasso chopped, or bacon or pancetta
  • Cajun/Creole seasoning to taste, or salt, pepper and cayenne
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
  • 2 medium potatoes white or sweet, peeled and cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 lb green beans trimmed and cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion coarsely chopped
  • 1 tbsp ghee or coconut oil or lard
  • 4 oz tasso chopped, or bacon or pancetta
  • Cajun/Creole seasoning to taste, or salt, pepper and cayenne
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a medium to large sauce pan add potatoes and cover with cold, salted water. Bring to a boil over medium high heat, reduce heat to medium and cook for 5 minutes.
  2. Add green beans and continue cooking until beans and potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes.
  3. Drain vegetables and set aside. Return sauce pan to the stove and add ghee over medium heat. Add onions and cook for 4-5 minutes or until translucent.
  4. Add tasso and cook for 5 minutes. Do not let the onions brown. Add potatoes and beans and toss, heating everything through and add Cajun/Creole seasoning to taste.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

Paleo Football Food

Paleo Apple Crisp

Paleo Apple Crisp

Did I get you with the apple crisp? It’s just as delicious as it looks. Think it might be just the thing for Thanksgiving. And the next get together at the Quebs (my in-laws). The ultimate compliment (I think?) was Harris’s comment, “This isn’t paleo, is it?” Why, yes. Yes, it is! Too good to be true? Nope. Not at all.

But getting back to football. Most football (or movie watching) munchies are of the “no carb left behind” variety, and often do not make for a satisfying meal. An evening game cries out for supper snacking that satisfies. So here’s the line up:

Paleo Football Food

Paleo Football Food

We have meat for sustenance, vegetables for color and contrast and Louisiana and Italy for inspiration! Some raw vegetables with a dip is about all the more you could ask for. Starting with Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus spears, I ramped up my version by adding crunch and flavor with pesto-style ingredients: pine nuts, basil and garlic.

Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus - Pesto Style

Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus – Pesto Style

Then I gave Scotch Eggs a run for the money by using South Louisiana favorites, andouille sausage and pickled quail eggs. The spice and vinegar in the eggs brighten the sausage, and the size is manageable. Most Scotch Eggs are as big as a cat’s head and covered with bread crumbs. But this is football food! We don’t need no stinkin’ bread crumbs!

Andouille Scotch Eggs

Andouille Scotch Eggs

Then we have the Pepperoni Pizza Bites gone paleo. No cheese need apply. None needed.

Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites

Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites

And finally dessert. If you don’t love this, invite me over and I’ll give your leftovers a good home.

Paleo Apple Crisp

Paleo Apple Crisp

So there you have it. But one more thing: all of these recipes can be prepared ahead and baked as needed. There’s only one oven temperature, so you don’t need to shuffle or calculate. You can serve one item at a time or a few of several. That way there’s not a lot of kitchen work during the show, and you can crank out fresh, hot goodies all night long. If the apple crisp is chilled before the final baking, it might require an extra few minutes to bake. You just have to taste and see if it’s done. Poor you!

I’ll spare you any football related music and go with a collection of eclectic tunes. Enjoy! And seriously. Let me know how you like the apple crisp.

Paleo Apple Crisp
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Paleo Apple Crisp with Maple Ice Cream
So good, they'll think it can't be paleo, apple crisp goes low in sugar, but high in flavor, and paired with coconut milk ice cream, it's a winner for sure.
Paleo Apple Crisp with Maple Ice Cream
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
So good, they'll think it can't be paleo, apple crisp goes low in sugar, but high in flavor, and paired with coconut milk ice cream, it's a winner for sure.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a medium saucepan, melt 2 tbsp butter and add 2 tbsp coconut sugar over medium heat. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally until mixture is thick and bubbly. Add apples, 2 tsp cinnamon and a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring occasionally until partially cooked through, about 15 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile butter a medium-sized baking dish. In a medium bowl, combine almond flour, chopped pecans, remaining butter and remaining coconut sugar and a pinch of salt. Mix until crumbly. Place apples in baking dish. Dot almond flour mixture over the top of the apples. Bake for 20 minutes. Serve with Maple Ice Cream if desired.
Maple Ice Cream
  1. In a two-quart pitcher, mix together all ingredients until thoroughly combined. Pour into ice cream maker. Prepare according to manufacturer's instructions. Transfer ice cream to lidded container and store in freezer until ready to use.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus - Pesto Style
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus—Pesto Style
Crispy prosciutto-wrapped asparagus spears are dressed up pesto style with pine nuts, basil and a touch of garlic.
Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus—Pesto Style
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Crispy prosciutto-wrapped asparagus spears are dressed up pesto style with pine nuts, basil and a touch of garlic.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Lay a slice of prosciutto on an oiled baking sheet. Place an asparagus spear on top. Sprinkle with pine nuts, basil and garlic powder. Roll up. Sprinkle with additional pine nuts.
  2. Bake for 20 minutes. Serve
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Andouille Scotch Eggs
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Andouille Scotch Eggs
Fresh andouille sausage and pickled quail eggs give Scotch eggs a whole new taste. Versatile and delicious, small hard-boiled eggs and any kind of fresh sausage provide many variations for a football snack that satisfies.
Andouille Scotch Eggs
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Fresh andouille sausage and pickled quail eggs give Scotch eggs a whole new taste. Versatile and delicious, small hard-boiled eggs and any kind of fresh sausage provide many variations for a football snack that satisfies.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Using 1/8 of the sausage, pat a flat circle in the palm of your hand, thin enough to enclose 1 egg. Pinch the edges to close and roll gently in your hands to make a ball. Continue with remaining sausage and eggs.
  2. Roast for 35 minutes if using qual eggs. Larger eggs will require additional time. Check every five minutes or so until larger meatballs are fully cooked.
Recipe Notes

The proportions for this recipe are based on using quail eggs. Hard-boiled chicken eggs can be substituted and depending on the size will require additional amounts of sausage. I found some fresh andouille sausage which is uncooked and can be removed from the casings. Smoked andouille sausage is pre-cooked and cannot be used in this preparation.

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites
Spicy peppers, earth mushrooms, fresh tomato and a sprinkle of oregano top paleo pepperoni pizza bites.
Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Spicy peppers, earth mushrooms, fresh tomato and a sprinkle of oregano top paleo pepperoni pizza bites.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place tomato slices on paper towels to remove excess moisture. In a small skillet over medium heat, cook the mushrooms and onions about 5 minutes.
  2. On a baking sheet, place pepperoni slices. Top with a tomato slice, some mushrooms and green peppers, and sprinkle with oregano and crushed red pepper flakes. Bake for 15 minutes. Serve.
Recipe Notes

Coin-sized pepperoni slices will not work well for this recipe, they're too small.

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes

UA-50778616-1