Archive | Pork

Creole Shakshuka

Creole Shakshuka

Creole Shakshuka

It’s pretty hot in south Louisiana and sometimes a salad for supper doesn’t cut it. But I wanted something fresh and lively. I don’t do breakfast except for coffee. Occasionally I’ll have what amounts to brunch on the weekends, but I love eggs and thought of this dish for dinner. Tunisian in origin, shakshuka is a tomato and bell pepper sauce that has eggs poached in it. While nice on it’s own, I wanted to make it more substantial. So I added some fabulous smoked deer sausage from Kartchner’s and creolized the seasonings. If you haven’t been to Kartchner’s in Krotz Springs, it’s so worth a trip! The boudin is amazing. And the cracklin’s are the best; I refer to them as paleo pig candy. 🙂

Eggs, tomatoes and herbs

Eggs, tomatoes and herbs

If there is a more versatile ingredient than an egg, I don’t know what it is. Eggs can be hard boiled, scrambled, fried, poached, and shirred. If you separate the yolks and whip the whites, eggs are magically transformed into soufflĂ©s and meringues. A wonder of nutritional goodness, eggs have regained their place in the hall of fame of good real foods. And compared to other nutrient-dense ingredients, eggs are cheap. I’d like to think that paleo peeps are a strong reason that eggs are once again recognized for their contribution to health. And one of our goals is to have more grassfed and pastured options in our kitchens. If you don’t have yard birds of your own, or can’t make it to the farmers market, don’t despair, the good news is free-range eggs may become more available. And make this egg recipe! It’s delicious.

To accompany the shakshuka, I thought creamy avocados and bright, fresh citrus would be welcome. So I’ve paired the egg dish with a grapefruit and avocado salad.

Grapefruit Avocado Salad

Grapefruit Avocado Salad

New music this week … dance, dine and enjoy!!

Creole Shakshuka
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Creole Shakshuka
Creole Shakshuka: quick and easy for weeknight supper, or the star of your next brunch. Paleo, gluten free, low carb and delicious.
Creole Shakshuka
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Creole Shakshuka: quick and easy for weeknight supper, or the star of your next brunch. Paleo, gluten free, low carb and delicious.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
4servings 10minutes 25minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Cook Time
25minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Over medium heat in a 12-inch skillet, add sausage and cook, stirring occasionally until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Remove sausage to a plate and reserve.
  2. Add olive oil to now empty skillet and add onion. Sauté for 5 minutes. Add bell pepper and celery and continue to sauté for 5 minutes. Add diced tomatoes and roasted peppers. Season to taste. Bring to a rapid simmer and lower heat to medium low. Return sausage to skillet and combine.
  3. Crack eggs into the tomato sauce, leaving a bit of room around each eggs. Cover and simmer until egg whites are set and yolks are desired consistency, about 5 minutes for runny yolks. Garnish with parsley and green onions.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Grapefruit Avocado Salad
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Grapefruit Avocado Salad
Juicy pink grapefruit and luscious avocado with a refreshing citrus dressing combine into a perfect summer salad.
Grapefruit Avocado Salad
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Juicy pink grapefruit and luscious avocado with a refreshing citrus dressing combine into a perfect summer salad.
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Make dressing: combine lime juice, honey, olive oil, salt and pepper. Distribute baby spinach on salad plates. Alternate grapefruit sections and avocado slices on top of spinach. Drizzle with dressing.Grapefruit Avocado Salad
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

2

Muffuletta Pork Chops and Zydeco Green Beans

Muffuletta Pork Chops and Zydeco Green Beans

Muffuletta Pork Chops and Zydeco Green Beans

Way, way back in the day, folks in Acadiana would hold a bal de maison, or house dance for their friends and neighbors. You’d let everybody know by putting a flag on your fence by the road. Food was served and it was a night of music and socializing for the whole family. Another name for these dances is fais do do, which is Louisiana-French baby talk for “go to sleep.” Baby sitters weren’t a thing then, but the dances would run late. So the kids would pile into a back room to sleep. As kids are wont to do, they often popped up and ran back out into the action, and their mamas would admonish them by saying, “fais do do,” so she could get back to the fun.

Occasionally the fare served at the dance was meager. So the host might pass the word that, les haricots sont pas salĂ©, “the green beans aren’t salty,” meaning that the beans were without pork. In French, les haricots would be pronounced, “lay zarico,” and eventually zarico morphed into zydeco and became the name for the music that was played at the dance. Originally French-speaking Cajuns and Creoles all played the same music. Starting at the end of World War II, Cajun music kind of went country and zydeco picked up on rhythm and blues.

My recipe for Zydeco Green Beans is made with tasso, but you could use bacon or pancetta. And instead of white (or as they say around here, Irish) potatoes, you can substitute sweet.

Zydeco Green Beans

Zydeco Green Beans

For the pork chops, we salute New Orleans and their iconic sandwich, the muffuletta. Not especially paleo, the muffuletta’s signature element is the olive salad. I love salsas and relishes with meat and poultry, and this addition makes for a nice change from gravy or a pan sauce. The whole meal is quick and easy, and delicious, too.

Muffuletta Pork Chops Seasoned

Muffuletta Pork Chops Seasoned

My playlist reflects the dishes with tunes by bands that play in and around New Orleans and a bunch of my favorite zydeco songs. Originally the playlist was two-and-a-half hours long, and obviously I’ve left out whole genres of Louisiana music. If I’d included the many forms of jazz, swamp pop, and Cajun, there’d be two-and-a-half days of music … with too much left out. So this will give you a taste.

Just a note and maybe you have some feedback for me. Since November my posts haven’t been as consistently scheduled as I’d like. The writing, recipe creation, music and website aspects are not a problem, but the photography has been. At first I started with just my iPhone 4, and after six months, darling Harris gave me a DSLR for Christmas. I tried learning to use it on my own through Internet searches and online courses. I was beginning to see some success, especially by having my a few of my photos accepted by foodgawker.com, but it was hit or miss. Then I had some private lessons with a professional photographer, got a macro lens and started on a new photo journey. The lens is amazing, but my “studio” lacks good lighting. And the lens is tricky to work with.

I think I’ve finally figured out a better system for the light, and we’ll see how it goes with foodgawker. It’s frustrating to know I’ve got to go back and re-shoot so many photos from the early posts, while trying to keep up with new ones. And foodgawker is vital to my becoming known in the enormous world of recipe blogs, as it has been responsible for some of my recipes being featured on sites like paleoleap.com and paleogrubs.com and new subscribers have found me through them.

What do you think? Any advice? I know photos are super important. Thank you for any words of wisdom you might have!

Muffuletta Pork Chops

Muffuletta Pork Chops

 

Muffuletta Pork Chops and Zydeco Green Beans
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Muffuletta Pork Chops
Muffuletta Pork Chops salute NOLA with the addition of savory olive salad. Giardiniera (pickled cauliflower, celery, peppers and onions) can be found in the pickle section of the super market. Cook the pork chops in my Cajun Country ghee for extra flavor!
Muffuletta Pork Chops
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Muffuletta Pork Chops salute NOLA with the addition of savory olive salad. Giardiniera (pickled cauliflower, celery, peppers and onions) can be found in the pickle section of the super market. Cook the pork chops in my Cajun Country ghee for extra flavor!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
4servings 10minutes 25minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Cook Time
25minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Season pork chops and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a 12-inch, ovenproof skillet over medium high heat, melt the ghee. Add the pork chops and brown, without moving, for 5 minutes. Turn the chops and brown the second side, 5 minutes.
  3. Place skillet in the oven and cook for about 5 minutes. Check the internal temperature of the chops with an instant read thermometer. This will depend on the thickness of the chops. They should be 160 degrees F. If needed, continue to cook, checking temperature every 5 minutes.
  4. Serve immediately, topped with olive salad.
  5. Giardiniera
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Zydeco Green Beans
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Zydeco Green Beans
Snappy, salty and delicious, Zydeco Green Beans add a two-for-one side dish for meat, poultry or seafood. Et toi!
Zydeco Green Beans
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Snappy, salty and delicious, Zydeco Green Beans add a two-for-one side dish for meat, poultry or seafood. Et toi!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Passive Time
4servings 10minutes 30minutes 20minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30minutes 20minutes
Ingredients
  • 2 medium potatoes white or sweet, peeled and cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 lb green beans trimmed and cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion coarsely chopped
  • 1 tbsp ghee or coconut oil or lard
  • 4 oz tasso chopped, or bacon or pancetta
  • Cajun/Creole seasoning to taste, or salt, pepper and cayenne
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
  • 2 medium potatoes white or sweet, peeled and cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 lb green beans trimmed and cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion coarsely chopped
  • 1 tbsp ghee or coconut oil or lard
  • 4 oz tasso chopped, or bacon or pancetta
  • Cajun/Creole seasoning to taste, or salt, pepper and cayenne
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a medium to large sauce pan add potatoes and cover with cold, salted water. Bring to a boil over medium high heat, reduce heat to medium and cook for 5 minutes.
  2. Add green beans and continue cooking until beans and potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes.
  3. Drain vegetables and set aside. Return sauce pan to the stove and add ghee over medium heat. Add onions and cook for 4-5 minutes or until translucent.
  4. Add tasso and cook for 5 minutes. Do not let the onions brown. Add potatoes and beans and toss, heating everything through and add Cajun/Creole seasoning to taste.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
0

Paleo Football Food

Paleo Apple Crisp

Paleo Apple Crisp

Did I get you with the apple crisp? It’s just as delicious as it looks. Think it might be just the thing for Thanksgiving. And the next get together at the Quebs (my in-laws). The ultimate compliment (I think?) was Harris’s comment, “This isn’t paleo, is it?” Why, yes. Yes, it is! Too good to be true? Nope. Not at all.

But getting back to football. Most football (or movie watching) munchies are of the “no carb left behind” variety, and often do not make for a satisfying meal. An evening game cries out for supper snacking that satisfies. So here’s the line up:

Paleo Football Food

Paleo Football Food

We have meat for sustenance, vegetables for color and contrast and Louisiana and Italy for inspiration! Some raw vegetables with a dip is about all the more you could ask for. Starting with Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus spears, I ramped up my version by adding crunch and flavor with pesto-style ingredients: pine nuts, basil and garlic.

Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus - Pesto Style

Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus – Pesto Style

Then I gave Scotch Eggs a run for the money by using South Louisiana favorites, andouille sausage and pickled quail eggs. The spice and vinegar in the eggs brighten the sausage, and the size is manageable. Most Scotch Eggs are as big as a cat’s head and covered with bread crumbs. But this is football food! We don’t need no stinkin’ bread crumbs!

Andouille Scotch Eggs

Andouille Scotch Eggs

Then we have the Pepperoni Pizza Bites gone paleo. No cheese need apply. None needed.

Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites

Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites

And finally dessert. If you don’t love this, invite me over and I’ll give your leftovers a good home.

Paleo Apple Crisp

Paleo Apple Crisp

So there you have it. But one more thing: all of these recipes can be prepared ahead and baked as needed. There’s only one oven temperature, so you don’t need to shuffle or calculate. You can serve one item at a time or a few of several. That way there’s not a lot of kitchen work during the show, and you can crank out fresh, hot goodies all night long. If the apple crisp is chilled before the final baking, it might require an extra few minutes to bake. You just have to taste and see if it’s done. Poor you!

I’ll spare you any football related music and go with a collection of eclectic tunes. Enjoy! And seriously. Let me know how you like the apple crisp.

Paleo Apple Crisp
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Paleo Apple Crisp with Maple Ice Cream
So good, they'll think it can't be paleo, apple crisp goes low in sugar, but high in flavor, and paired with coconut milk ice cream, it's a winner for sure.
Paleo Apple Crisp with Maple Ice Cream
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
So good, they'll think it can't be paleo, apple crisp goes low in sugar, but high in flavor, and paired with coconut milk ice cream, it's a winner for sure.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a medium saucepan, melt 2 tbsp butter and add 2 tbsp coconut sugar over medium heat. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally until mixture is thick and bubbly. Add apples, 2 tsp cinnamon and a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring occasionally until partially cooked through, about 15 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile butter a medium-sized baking dish. In a medium bowl, combine almond flour, chopped pecans, remaining butter and remaining coconut sugar and a pinch of salt. Mix until crumbly. Place apples in baking dish. Dot almond flour mixture over the top of the apples. Bake for 20 minutes. Serve with Maple Ice Cream if desired.
Maple Ice Cream
  1. In a two-quart pitcher, mix together all ingredients until thoroughly combined. Pour into ice cream maker. Prepare according to manufacturer's instructions. Transfer ice cream to lidded container and store in freezer until ready to use.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus - Pesto Style
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus—Pesto Style
Crispy prosciutto-wrapped asparagus spears are dressed up pesto style with pine nuts, basil and a touch of garlic.
Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus—Pesto Style
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Crispy prosciutto-wrapped asparagus spears are dressed up pesto style with pine nuts, basil and a touch of garlic.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Lay a slice of prosciutto on an oiled baking sheet. Place an asparagus spear on top. Sprinkle with pine nuts, basil and garlic powder. Roll up. Sprinkle with additional pine nuts.
  2. Bake for 20 minutes. Serve
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Andouille Scotch Eggs
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Andouille Scotch Eggs
Fresh andouille sausage and pickled quail eggs give Scotch eggs a whole new taste. Versatile and delicious, small hard-boiled eggs and any kind of fresh sausage provide many variations for a football snack that satisfies.
Andouille Scotch Eggs
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Fresh andouille sausage and pickled quail eggs give Scotch eggs a whole new taste. Versatile and delicious, small hard-boiled eggs and any kind of fresh sausage provide many variations for a football snack that satisfies.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Using 1/8 of the sausage, pat a flat circle in the palm of your hand, thin enough to enclose 1 egg. Pinch the edges to close and roll gently in your hands to make a ball. Continue with remaining sausage and eggs.
  2. Roast for 35 minutes if using qual eggs. Larger eggs will require additional time. Check every five minutes or so until larger meatballs are fully cooked.
Recipe Notes

The proportions for this recipe are based on using quail eggs. Hard-boiled chicken eggs can be substituted and depending on the size will require additional amounts of sausage. I found some fresh andouille sausage which is uncooked and can be removed from the casings. Smoked andouille sausage is pre-cooked and cannot be used in this preparation.

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites
Spicy peppers, earth mushrooms, fresh tomato and a sprinkle of oregano top paleo pepperoni pizza bites.
Paleo Pepperoni Pizza Bites
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Spicy peppers, earth mushrooms, fresh tomato and a sprinkle of oregano top paleo pepperoni pizza bites.
Servings
4servings
Servings
4servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Place tomato slices on paper towels to remove excess moisture. In a small skillet over medium heat, cook the mushrooms and onions about 5 minutes.
  2. On a baking sheet, place pepperoni slices. Top with a tomato slice, some mushrooms and green peppers, and sprinkle with oregano and crushed red pepper flakes. Bake for 15 minutes. Serve.
Recipe Notes

Coin-sized pepperoni slices will not work well for this recipe, they're too small.

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
0

Roast Pork Tonight!

Roast pork recipe. Paleo, gluten free, low carb.

Why wait for Sunday dinner? Have succulent, roast pork tonight! Make it a paleo, low carb, gluten free, one-dish meal with crisp, tender veg.

 

Our family had a roast-for-Sunday-dinner tradition. My mom would put on a roast beef or pork loin roast before Mass and when we got home, it was like waiting to open Christmas presents. The aromas that filled the house were tantalizing and appetite arousing. The crisp crust, juicy and flavorful meat beckoned us to the table and satisfied like crazy. As a family of seven, we made short work of a big roast, but in the fast-paced world of modern reality, roasts like these are special occasion, big group meals. So I decided to try to replicate the wonders of the Sunday dinner roast in a weeknight-meal format.

One pot dishes are good: stir fries, stews, casseroles, but I wanted the deep flavors and crusty exterior of a beloved pork roast that could serve one or a dozen and be ready in about an hour. Plus I didn’t want a lot of fussy prep. A variety of vegetables was in order. Some fruit to complement the savory goodness of pork was a welcome addition. A minimum of clean up items was a must as well.

Bringing that New England tradition to South Louisiana meant infusing the meat with seasoning. This region has earned scores of awards for the excellence of the local food. I think the heart of that excellence lies in the proper seasoning of the ingredients. The craze for brining got the nation started on this awareness, but it’s a drag to drown good poultry in water and this approach does nothing for other meats. The truth is, you can season meats, poultry and seafood without water and still achieve maximum flavor. Every supermarket and specialty meat market in the area offers already seasoned items. The problem for me is, often the meat or chicken has lingered in the seasoning (which is applied with a really heavy hand) too long and can often overwhelm the reason for the season(ing). Sometimes off flavors develop, too.

So I always opt for seasoning things myself. I can use as much of whatever ingredients I like, and I can control the length of time. I employed a tip I learned from America’s Test Kitchen about cooking meats to ensure a crisp exterior: add baking powder to the seasoning which allows the surface to dry. Elevating the meat on a rack over a small baking sheet and leaving the it uncovered in the fridge does the trick.

Use an unusual cut for the recipe: bone-in country-style ribs to replace pork loin or Boston butt. Each meaty, well marbled piece is one generous portion, which means you can cook as many or as few as you wish. And the small size means it will cook up to perfection in an hour. Once the meat is browned in a grill pan or cast iron skillet (or any heavy-bottom, oven proof skillet) the meat is removed, the vegetables added and tossed in the browning juices, the meat replaced on top of the veg, and the skillet is popped in the oven. Then you can help the kids with homework, catch up on email or take a bubble bath if you like. Your supper will cook up tender, delicious and crackling. I hope you’ll try this recipe. Feel free to substitute other vegetables or add some favorites. And let me know how you like it!

For a refreshing side, I’ve added a quick, quick cucumber salad. The crunch and acidity are a nice contrast to the rich meat.

There’s a mixed bag of tunes this week. The first, by Elle King has the makings of long-lasting hit, the hook will stay with you long after you dance around the house, tantalized by the aromas wafting through the air, waiting for, and then savoring this yummy supper. Enjoy!!

Roast pork recipe. Paleo, gluten free, low carb.
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Roast Pork Tonight!
Why wait for Sunday dinner? Have succulent, roast pork goodness any weeknight. Make it a paleo, low carb, gluten free, one-dish meal with crisp, tender veg.
Roast Pork Tonight!
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Why wait for Sunday dinner? Have succulent, roast pork goodness any weeknight. Make it a paleo, low carb, gluten free, one-dish meal with crisp, tender veg.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Passive Time
4servings 10minutes 1 1/4hours 1hour
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1 1/4hours 1hour
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Up to 24 hours prior to cooking, place baking powder and seasonings in large zip top bag. Add ribs, one at a time, and shake to coat completely. Shake off excess and place on a rack over a small baking sheet or plate. Repeat with remaining ribs. Place in refrigerator, uncovered, until ready to cook.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Heat grill pan or oven-proof skillet over medium high heat. Add ribs, leaving a little space around each one. If making a double recipe, brown in batches. Melt the ghee, honey, lemon juice, garlic and Tabasco sauce in a small saucepan. Allow the fat to render a bit on the ribs, and cook on each of the four sides about 3-4 minutes, 12-15 minutes total. After the ribs are turned to the second side, baste each one with honey. Continue basting as each side is turned.
  3. Remove ribs to a plate. Add all remaining ingredients and toss to combine. Spread in a even layer and place ribs in a single layer on top of the vegetable mixture. Place in oven. Roast for one hour, basting meat occasionally with remaining honey sauce.
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Lightning fast, super crisp, spicy and delicious. This cucumber salad is paleo, low carb and gluten free.

Lightning fast, super crisp, spicy and delicious. This cucumber salad is paleo, low carb and gluten free.

Lightning fast, super crisp, spicy and delicious. This cucumber salad is paleo, low carb and gluten free.
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Spicy Cucumber Crunch
Lightning fast, super crisp, spicy and delicious. This cucumber salad is paleo, low carb and gluten free.
Spicy Cucumber Crunch
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Lightning fast, super crisp, spicy and delicious. This cucumber salad is paleo, low carb and gluten free.
Servings Prep Time
4servings 5minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 5minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Place sliced cucumbers in serving dish. Dressing with vinegar, salt, pepper and hot peppers. Serve.
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
0

Collard Rolls with Boudin and Meyer Lemon Beurre Blanc

Cabbage Rolls' South Louisiana Cousin: Easy boudin filled collard leaves with luscious Meyer Lemon Beurre Blanc.

Cabbage Rolls’ South Louisiana Cousin: Easy boudin filled collard leaves with luscious Meyer Lemon Beurre Blanc.

Collaboration is a beautiful thing. Bringing together different skills to a shared goal is rich and fulfilling. Families should endeavor to do this as much as possible. Marriages within this framework are gratifying and life-affirming. So it is with the menu this week.

Harris’s garden continues to produce: Meyer lemons, collard greens, broccoli, and green onion tops. His new greenhouse is alive with thriving vegetables, flowers, tiny trees, ferns, and seedlings. We’ve dined on perfectly ripened tomatoes, and I harvested a handful of bâton-rouge red Tabasco peppers, dried and crushed them.

A corner of Harris's prolific greenhouse.

A corner of Harris’s prolific greenhouse.

Last week Harris had a brainstorm: how about filling the collard leaves with boudin? That sounded great; we had the requisite components, and I hadn’t narrowed down my recipes for the post. I asked, “What kind of sauce do you think would be good?” His answer: “Something with lemon.” The collaboration began, and the inspired result makes a unique and delicious entrĂ©e.

There’s an old joke about a South Louisiana seven-course meal: a six-pack of beer and a yard of boudin. Generally speaking, boudin is a snack food. Eaten on the go, it’s hard to resist diving into the fragrant, steamy treat, hot from your favorite boudin purveyor. Probably 90 percent of the boudin sold in this state is consumed while driving. Boudin for supper would be amazing and different. And a twist on cabbage rolls would be fun to try.

The collards are a perfect choice for wrapping the pork and rice sausage. Cabbage would be too strong. A sweet, tomato-based sauce wouldn’t do at all. Eliminating the baking stage would make a super quick and easy meal. The Meyer lemon beurre blanc would tie all the elements together. So we thought, and right we are. We both flipped for the combo and will make it a staple recipe in our repertoire.

They say that people in Acadiana have two distinct methods for procuring their boudin and their boiled crawfish: the boudin must be around the corner, and the crawfish has to entail a road trip. That was partially the case in our house … until a fateful trip to LSU one memorable and happy Sunday. We traveled a ways for both boudin and boiled crawfish, but the travel time increased for the boudin.

Harris was returning the girl child to school, and the packed parking lot at their usual boudin stop in Krotz Springs sent them across the street to a place we’d passed by a hundred times: Kartchner’s Grocery and Specialty Meats. Shame on us! That first purchase of boudin and cracklins led to a ritual snacking stop to and from LSU. We purchased boudin-stuffed chickens, deer sausage, duck-and-jalapeño sausage, housemade bacon and so much more — all of it superb. And now that our girl has graduated, it’s a good 20 minutes from the house: good being the operative word. If you’re ever in the area, don’t miss this gem. Just watch your speedometer. The limit is 45 and getting caught going over will cost you a bundle for your delicious boudin.

Don’t despair if boudin doesn’t exist in your area. It’s very simple to make. The hardest part is stuffing the casings, and that’s unnecessary for this dish. I’ve paired the collard rolls with smashed butternut squash. Or you could serve mashed potatoes.

For the music, I’ve chosen a playlist that is sparkling and contemplative by turns. It features Grace Kelly on sax — oh yeah, go check it out — and a tune by Terrance Simien that’s included on a new CD of Cajun and Creole lullabies. Talk about a collaboration! The Lafayette General Medical Center and Louisiana Folk Roots teamed up and created music to welcome newborns to the world. It’s called, “Je m’endors,” and it’s lovely. If you know a new parent, it makes a terrific gift. Another great tune is by Bonsoir Catin from their newly Grammy-nominated CD. So from our house in the woods to your abode: we hope your holiday season is off to a merry beginning, and that you enjoy our newest recipe collaboration!

Cabbage Rolls' South Louisiana Cousin: Easy boudin filled collard leaves with luscious Meyer Lemon Beurre Blanc.
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Collard Rolls with Boudin and Meyer Lemon Beurre Blanc
Iconic and delicious, boudin is not often a suppertime treat. But why not? And in this homage to cabbage rolls, boudin is wrapped in collard leaves and served with a Meyer lemon butter sauce. Super fast to make if you have a favorite boudin place nearby, and collard leaves are easier to work with than cabbage. If you (sadly) don't have access to Kartchner's in Krotz Springs, Louisiana, included is a recipe for making boudin yourself.
Collard Rolls with Boudin and Meyer Lemon Beurre Blanc
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Iconic and delicious, boudin is not often a suppertime treat. But why not? And in this homage to cabbage rolls, boudin is wrapped in collard leaves and served with a Meyer lemon butter sauce. Super fast to make if you have a favorite boudin place nearby, and collard leaves are easier to work with than cabbage. If you (sadly) don't have access to Kartchner's in Krotz Springs, Louisiana, included is a recipe for making boudin yourself.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Passive Time
6servings 20minutes 15minutes 1hour
Servings Prep Time
6servings 20minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
15minutes 1hour
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. In an oven-proof pot, place pork, liver, onion, green pepper, celery, garlic and seasonings. Add cool water to cover by 1 inch. Bring to boil over medium high heat. Stir, cover and place in oven. Cook for 2 hours or until meat is tender.
  2. Being sure to reserve the meat-cooking liquid, remove the meat and vegetables, draining well, onto a sheet pan and allow to cool.
  3. In batches, chop meat and vegetable mixture well and add to a large mixing bowl. Add cooked rice and green onions. Mix thoroughly. By small amounts, add reserved cooking liquid and mix, until the boudin holds together when you scoop up a handful and squeeze it gently. Chill in refrigerator 30 minutes or until ready to assemble collard rolls.
  4. Fill a large bowl with ice, water and a tablespoon of salt. Fill a large sauce pot three fourths full of water and bring to a boil over high heat. Add salt and collard leaves one at a time so they remain flat. Lower heat to brisk simmer and cook collards for 5 minutes. Remove collards to ice water, stirring gently. When cool, carefully remove leaves and drain.
  5. In a large pot outfitted with a steamer tray, put 1-inch of water. Shape boudin into 3-inch logs (or remove boudin from casings and cut into 3-inch segments. Starting at the stem end of a collard leaf, place boudin perpendicular to the leaf stem and roll up once, pull sides of leaf to the middle, overlapping the ends. Continue to roll until neat, tight package is created. Repeat with remaining collard leaves and boudin.
  6. Fill steamer liner or basket with collard rolls and place inside pot. Bring water to a boil making sure water does not touch the bottom of the collard rolls. Steam until heated through, 10-12 minutes. Check temperature of filling by inserting the tip of a sharp paring knife into one of the rolls and touching the tip to your lip. When it is hot enough, turn off burner and remove rolls carefully. The filling will be soft, so using a large slotted spoon or a spatula is better than tongs.
For the Meyer lemon beurre blanc
  1. Add lemon juice and shallots to a small sauce pan over medium heat. Reduce to about a tablespoon, 3-5 minutes. Remove the shallots draining well. Return reduced lemon juice to the pan.
  2. This sauce is about technique. In order to keep it from "breaking" or losing its creamy look and consistency, the sauce cannot get too warm. Add a tablespoon of butter and without a spoon, swirl the butter in the reduced lemon juice. Above the low heat of the burner, continue swirling the pan, lowering it to gain additional heat and removing it once the butter starts to melt. Do not place pan directly on the burner. Continue add the butter by the single tablespoons, swirling and lowering. After one stick of butter has been added, season with salt, white pepper and cayenne to taste. Taste for acidity level. This is very personal. Continue to add butter by the spoonful until the flavor is bright with lemon flavor, but not too tart for your taste. Remove pan to a back, unlit burner until the collard rolls are ready to serve. Don't worry if the beurre blanc becomes thickened and starts to congeal. The heat of the collard rolls will return it to sauce consistency. Note: If the sauce does break, don't fret about it. Tell your diners you are serving a broken beurre blanc. The flavor will still be delicious.
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Earthy and creamy, this is butternut squash with lots of flavor.
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Smashed Butternut Squash
Squash that's boiled can be washed out and tasteless. Simmering the vegetable in butter and cream allows the full, sweet flavor to come through. And don't feel guilty about the richness: fat is needed for your system to extract the nutrients found in vegetables. Enjoy and be nourished!
Smashed Butternut Squash
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Squash that's boiled can be washed out and tasteless. Simmering the vegetable in butter and cream allows the full, sweet flavor to come through. And don't feel guilty about the richness: fat is needed for your system to extract the nutrients found in vegetables. Enjoy and be nourished!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Passive Time
4servings 10minutes 20minutes 15minutes
Servings Prep Time
4servings 10minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20minutes 15minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Place squash, butter and heavy cream in sauce pan over medium heat. When butter is melted, lower heat to medium low and cook, stirring occasionally until squash is tender, about 15-20 minutes. Do not allow to brown.
  2. Mash the squash, leaving it as chunky as you like or until it is smooth. Season to taste, sprinkle with green onions and and a generous pat of butter.
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

 

0

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes

UA-50778616-1