Archive | November, 2015

Thanksgiving Recipes Round-up

We like tradition in our house when it comes to Thanksgiving recipes: no turkey, thank you. We have a standing rib roast of beef. With carrot soufflé, mashed potatoes and gravy, green bean casserole, homemade jellied cranberry sauce. (I’d post the recipe, but the photos weren’t worth it. If you’d like the recipe anyway, let me know, I’ll email it to you. It tastes delicious and is low on the sugar scale with only cranberries, apple cider, honey and low-sugar pectin as ingredients.)

The newest member to the celebration is future son-in-law, Michael. I asked him if he’d miss the turkey, and he said that he and parents had long ago given turkey the boot at Christmas, and had never looked back, so we’re batting a thousand a this point. Although I do miss roast turkey thigh. When Thanksgiving was at my parents’ house, I never had to compete for the dark meat. Give me the thigh any day. And around here, I haven’t found this cut available the markets where I shop. I’ll try again this week, though, because I’ll make it for supper for Harris and myself one night if I can find it.

So I thought I’d cruise the paleo and paleo-friendly blogs for some alternative Thanksgiving recipes to post. It’s my first round-up. There’s a recipe for a turkey dinner for two. Who says you have to have a crowd? One is for a green bean dish that’s not a casserole. I’m making a paleo-esque version of the old standby for our Thanksgiving dinner, but I haven’t come up with the recipe yet—I’ll do that when I’m set to make it. If it’s good, I’ll post it later in the year. Then there’s a pumpkin dessert. Gotta have that, right? And a recipe for leftover turkey.

For music, there’s some new Adele, a nod to the recently-departed Alan Toussaint, and some other tunes I hope you enjoy. As you pause to give thanks, remember the beloved people who’ve passed and cannot share your meal. Look around the table at the shining, wonderful faces you love. Raise a glass to those who are far away. Be grateful, and may your hearts be full.

Turkey Dinner for Two - themodernbuttery.com

Turkey Dinner for Two – themodernbuttery.com

Turkey Dinner for Two

Green Beans with Bacon, Mushrooms and Herbs - cookincanuck.com

Green Beans with Bacon, Mushrooms and Herbs – cookincanuck.com

Green Bean, Bacon, Mushroom and Herbs

Mini Pumpkin Pies - destinationdelish.com

Mini Pumpkin Pies – destinationdelish.com

Mini Pumpkin Pies

Turkey Lettuce Wraps -somethingnewfordinner.com

Turkey Lettuce Wraps – somethingnewfordinner.com

Turkey Lettuce Wraps

Roasted Red Fish with Piperade and Mardi Gras Salad

Roasted Red Fish and Mardi Gras Salad

Roasted Red Fish with Piperade and Mardi Gras Salad

People think that paleo food is expensive. It can be, but doesn’t have to be. Case in point: the fabulous red fish featured in this post was a gift. Thank you, Bruce!! His love of fishing and an abundance of fish in his freezer meant we got to have free fish. And not just red fish. There was a package of speckled trout and several of snapper, too. Around south Louisiana hunting, fishing and sharing are just three of the ways that people here “pass a good time” cher. We’re fortunate to have a diverse array of watery climes where fin fish and shellfish abound. For the price of a package of chicken necks, the normally luxurious crab can be feasted on for pennies. And whether you’re inland or on the coast, great fishing is available throughout the U.S. Here’s a recipe that will make your catch a delicious and easy-to-make meal.

 

Roasted Red Fish Ingredients

Roasted Red Fish Ingredients

Roasted Red Fish Topping Chopped

Piperade Chopped

Often fish is tricky to cook. It’s delicate and can break easily. Overcooking is a hazard. But this recipe is just about foolproof. The gentle heat of the oven and the juicy, flavorful topping called piperade, make timing flexible and fast. You can make endless variations on piperade depending on the flavors you prefer and the vegetables that are in season (which usually means cheaper, too). And you can take those beautiful filets out of the freezer and create a dish that tastes as fresh as the day it left the water. For some reason, fish caught, fileted and frozen by a fisherman is infinitely fresher tasting than something from the supermarket—even an upscale market. Make friends with a generous fisherman. Or better yet: go fishing yourself!

Roasted Red Fish

Roasted Red Fish with Piperade

To accompany the fish, I’m sharing a recipe from Cook’s Illustrated. I’ve had the great pleasure of serving as a recipe tester for CI for several years. This recipe appears in their most recent make-ahead cookbook, and it’s winner. They call it Overnight Sweet Potato Kale Salad, but the colors purple, green and gold scream Mardi Gras, so even though it’s jumping the season, that’s what I’m calling it.

Mardi Gras Salad Ingredients

Mardi Gras Salad Ingredients

There are very few overnight vegetable-only salads. By the time the dressing sinks in, most salads are wilted and taste bad. So Cook’s Illustrated decided to come up with a recipe that would be as great in your lunch at work as it was for dinner a few nights before. I’ve made a few changes. Recently in another sweet potato recipe, CI discovered that starting peeled, thickly sliced sweet potatoes in a cold oven brought out sweetness in the veg that normally doesn’t have a chance to develop. So I skipped the original directions and used this technique. There’s a scientific reason why this happens, but suffice it to say, it’s a winning idea. The dressing used pomegranate molasses. This ingredient is hard to find and is loaded with sugar. You can boil down some pomegranate juice until it’s syrupy and add a bit more honey, if you like, or you can do what I did for this version and use balsamic vinegar.

Mardi Gras Salad

Mardi Gras Salad

Roasted Red Fish

Roasted Red Fish

Roasted Red Fish

Like virtually all of the recipes in my collection, this is very affordable. But it’s also festive, healthy and delicious. I do hope you enjoy it and this week’s playlist as well!

Roasted Red Fish and Mardi Gras Salad
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Roasted Red Fish
Feel free to substitute any type of white fish filet. Thicker filets will take a few minutes longer to cook. When the fish is still moist and separates into sections easily, it's done. And use whatever vegetables you like for the topping. Onions, garlic, any type of pepper, minced summer squash or zucchini, thinly sliced green beans - just don't bury the fish. Sprinkle enough on top to get fish and veg in every bite, but leave a bit of white space.
Roasted Red Fish
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Feel free to substitute any type of white fish filet. Thicker filets will take a few minutes longer to cook. When the fish is still moist and separates into sections easily, it's done. And use whatever vegetables you like for the topping. Onions, garlic, any type of pepper, minced summer squash or zucchini, thinly sliced green beans - just don't bury the fish. Sprinkle enough on top to get fish and veg in every bite, but leave a bit of white space.
Servings Cook Time
4servings 15minutes
Servings
4servings
Cook Time
15minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a medium sauce pan, heat 1 tbsp olive oil. Add shallots and sauté for 1-2 minutes over medium heat. Add peppers and sauté 1-2 minutes. Add tomatoes and sauté 2 minutes. Remove from heatRoasted Red Fish Ingredients
  2. Drizzle remaining olive oil on a rimmed baking sheet and spread evenly over the bottom with a brush or your fingers. Lay fish filets on the baking sheet. Do not overlap. Spoon sautéd vegetables over the filets. Allow portions of the filets to show through. Roast for 10 minutes and check for doneness. Fish should be completely opaque and easily separate into sections. Continue to roast, if needed, checking every 4-5 minutes for doneness. Serve with lemon wedges.
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Mardi Gras Salad
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Mardi Gras Salad
This is my variation on Cook's Illustrated's Overnight Sweet Potato Kale Salad. It appears in their latest Make-Ahead cookbook published in September 2014.
Mardi Gras Salad
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
This is my variation on Cook's Illustrated's Overnight Sweet Potato Kale Salad. It appears in their latest Make-Ahead cookbook published in September 2014.
Servings
8servings
Servings
8servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Drizzle 1 tbsp olive oil on a rimmed baking sheet and toss sweet potatoes in the oil and season with salt and pepper. Cover with aluminum foil and place in unheated oven. Turn the oven to 425 degrees F. Roast for 20 minutes. Check to see that potatoes are tender by inserting the tip of a paring knife into the slices. If needed, roast for another 5 minutes and check again. Remove from the oven, place potatoes in a large bowl and set aside to cool, about 20 minutes.Mardi Gras Salad Ingredients
  2. Meanwhile whisk together the balsamic vinegar, honey and olive oil. Season with salt, pepper and crushed red pepper.
  3. Vigorously knead the raw kale on a cutting board with hands until uniformly dark green and wilted, about 5 minutes. Add to bowl with sweet potatoes. Add radicchio and 2/3 of the dressing. Toss and refrigerate for 24 hours. (It's also quite good when freshly made.) Cover remaining vinaigrette and refrigerate.
  4. When ready to serve, remove from refrigerator and let sit at room temperature for 15 minutes; add remaining vinaigrette, toss, and top with pecans and pomegranate seeds (if using).
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